Journal


Louise Bourgeois: Childhood Memories


Louise Bourgeois: Childhood Memories

"Everything I do was inspired by my early life."

 

Louise Bourgeois had a close relationship with her mother, before her mother’s death in 1932, when Louise was just 21. This close relationship was in part due to her father’s ten-year affair with her live-in tutor, Sadie Gordon Richmond. The discovery of this incident at age 11 caused Louise great psychological trauma and would go on to impact Louise’s life forever as well as define her body of work.



Instilling a Sense of Belonging: Wu Guanzhong


Instilling a Sense of Belonging: Wu Guanzhong

In traditional Chinese culture, the ancient ideals of truth, beauty and kindness have guided generations of Chinese civilization, including Wu Guanzhong. As mentioned in our previous article, Wu found beauty and stillness in nature. Not only in landscapes but also the simplicity of the Chinese countryside - interacting with those living there and being humbled by their heart and soul.


Wu Guanzhong and Nature


Wu Guanzhong and Nature

The profound beauty and stillness of nature guided Wu Guanzhong through his life and art practice. He spent his early life an as artist travelling around Jiangnan (a large area south of the Yangtze river that includes Shanghai, Hangzhou and Nanjing), known for its picturesque gardens, rivers and villages.


Finding Yourself: David Hockney (Part III)


Finding Yourself: David Hockney (Part III)

 

Every child has creativity and an urge to create. As we get older, this creativity may slowly disappear, or we can choose to develop it. It’s about finding and keeping that childlike spark in you. At times, David Hockney reminds me of Peter Pan. His obsession with creating, eagerness to explore new mediums and technology, and expressing his work in bright, cheerful colors.

 

“When I’m in the studio, I feel like I’m 30. But when I leave it, I know I’m 80.” 

 

Hockney’s journey with technology started early, with...




Finding Yourself: David Hockney (Part II)


Finding Yourself: David Hockney (Part II)

Friendships were important to David Hockney. Unlike many artists, Hockney rarely worked on commissioned portraits. Instead, he invited familiar faces like close friends, relatives and colleagues to sit for him, many of whom considered the sitting an honor.